Slide1.jpg
Slide1.jpg

VeryEasyToRemember


Using the identical overlaps

in the following belief systems,

this website promotes both the union

of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

and such a union’s amalgamation

with logical, secular thought.

—————————————————--

For more about this site’s approach,

click here for a Press Release

about a book that explains

peace’s eternal basis from both

religious and secular perspectives

—————————————————--

Click here to read a mind-blowing,

religion-affirming letter that,

without hype, could end agnosticism!

—————————————————--

Two poems by

Rabbi H. Chaim Gruber:

One Perfection

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

How to Live

What else to do but make the best of things?

Appreciate something good,

because to not, would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism,

because to fall, would make it worse.

—————————————————--

SCROLL DOWN

VeryEasyToRemember


Using the identical overlaps

in the following belief systems,

this website promotes both the union

of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

and such a union’s amalgamation

with logical, secular thought.

—————————————————--

For more about this site’s approach,

click here for a Press Release

about a book that explains

peace’s eternal basis from both

religious and secular perspectives

—————————————————--

Click here to read a mind-blowing,

religion-affirming letter that,

without hype, could end agnosticism!

—————————————————--

Two poems by

Rabbi H. Chaim Gruber:

One Perfection

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

How to Live

What else to do but make the best of things?

Appreciate something good,

because to not, would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism,

because to fall, would make it worse.

—————————————————--

 

The ancient sage, Moses Maimonides (aka the “Rambam”), wrote that Judaism, Christianity, and Islam would, in the eventual, worldwide Messianic age, unite into one religion "to serve God together." Partly based on this work of Maimonides, the theology of Rabbi H. Chaim Gruber, who is a subject of this website, focuses both on the union of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam via their shared theological principles and on the amalgamation of that union with logical, secular thought.

As that focus pertains to the two, above, secular poems, such verses logically express both the Judeo-Christian obligation to “love the LORD thy God” and the Islamic obligation to love Allah. Consider: Judeo-Christian or Islamic monotheism respectively names omnipresence either the LORD or Allah (Orthodox Jews call the LORD “Hashem”).* Therefore, because omnipresence includes all of life’s good and bad circumstances, loving the LORD, or loving Allah, is appreciatively making the very best of whatever life throws one’s way.

 

* Theologically, the LORD/Hashem/Allah is both omnipresent and distinct from creation. Beyond our full understanding, the Creator of the Universe is more than the created universe. To give one example, the out-of-the-box Creator’s ability to bend nature is what accounts for the existence of true miracles.

Thanks to Rabbi Gruber for reminding us all that life is a unity under the Divine Oneness which is the Creator.
— Imam Haytham Younis about the above expressed ideas of Rabbi Gruber.

Imam Younis is an imam at the Islamic Center of Maryland and is a Co-founder of the area’s Jewish-Islamic Dialogue Society

 


Rabbi Gruber's work to form an inseparable theological and logical union between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam might be considered controversial (if not impossible). For instance, Rabbi Gruber was once excommunicated from a part of the Hassidic-Jewish world because of his provocative teachings about Christianity. However, the Rabbi, thereafter, proved that his theology regarding Christianity was correct from an ultra-Orthodox, Jewish perspective; and, the influential, Hassidic, rabbinic judge who had publicly excommunicated him for the previous six days, then, un-excommunicated him!



The Rabbi as a Previously Hidden, Underground Artist

About the at-top, background, conceptual artwork (the original painting is pictured below): The text of the word-art reads, “GOD IS LOVE BECAUSE GOD IS OUR CREATOR AND WE’RE CREATING WITH LOVE BEING WHAT IS MOST SWEET.” That at-top-of-screen, background piece, with coloration altered from the original green and white (see below), comes from an Amsterdam showing of word-art paintings by the Rabbi, who, as his artist-self, exists under the underground pseudonym, The Holy Ghost of Jesus Christ.

Without hype, one or more of the word-art pieces from that September-2015 gallery show might have been the inspiration for Zara’s I-REALLY-DON’T-CARE-DO-U?, word-art jacket that was (in)famously worn by the U.S. First Lady! (The jacket came from the fashion house’s Spring-Summer collection of 2016.) In fact, when the Rabbi, as The Holy Ghost of Jesus Christ, showed his work in Amsterdam years ago, his word-art pieces were so ahead of the times that there was a lack of even a single collector. Click here for beautiful t-shirts with this God-Is-Love artwork that explains the eternal truth underlying the Biblical statement that GOD IS LOVE!