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One Perfection

 

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

 

How to Live

 

What else to do but to make the best of things?

Appreciate something good,

because to not would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism

because to fall would make the matter worse.

 

- Rabbi Chaim Gruber

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Home


One Perfection

 

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

 

How to Live

 

What else to do but to make the best of things?

Appreciate something good,

because to not would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism

because to fall would make the matter worse.

 

- Rabbi Chaim Gruber

 

 

Moses Maimonides (the Rambam), considered the greatest Orthodox rabbi of the past 900 years, wrote that Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in the eventual Messianic age, would unite into one religion so "to serve God together." Rabbi Chaim Gruber's theology, in part based on this work of Maimonides, focuses on (a) the union of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from their already-shared theological principles; and (b) the amalgamation of that union with logical, secular thought.

As such a theology pertains to the above poems, the two poems express the rabbi’s theology in that the poems logically explain both the Judeo-Christian obligation to “love the LORD thy God” and the Islamic obligation to love Allah. Consider: Judeo-Christian or Islamic monotheism respectively names omnipresence either the LORD or Allah (Orthodox Jews call the LORD “Hashem”). Therefore, because omnipresence includes all of life’s good and bad circumstances, loving the LORD, or loving Allah, is making the very best of whatever life throws one’s way.

 

NOTE: Theologically, the LORD/Hashem/Allah is both omnipresent and distinct from creation. Beyond our full understanding, the Creator of the Universe is more than the created universe. In fact, the out-of-the-box Creator’s ability to bend nature is what accounts for the existence of true miracles.

 
Thanks to Rabbi Gruber for reminding us all that life is a unity under the Divine Oneness which is the Creator.
— Imam Haytham Younis about the above expressed ideas of Rabbi Gruber.

Imam Younis is an imam at the Islamic Center of Maryland and is a Co-Founder of the Jewish-Islamic Dialogue Society

 

Some in the Orthodox Jewish world may consider Rabbi Gruber's work to form a union between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam controversial. For instance, Rabbi Gruber, was once excommunicated from a part of the Hassidic-Jewish world because of his teachings about Christianity. However, Rabbi Gruber, thereafter, proved that his theology regarding Christianity was correct from an Orthodox-Jewish perspective; and, the influential Hassidic rabbi who had publicly excommunicated him, then, publicly un-excommunicated him! (Click "Unexcommunication" at screen's top for more.)