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One Perfection

 

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

 

How to Live

 

What else to do but to make the best of things?

You should appreciate something that's good

because to not, would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism,

because to fall would make the matter worse.

 

- Rabbi Chaim Gruber

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Home


One Perfection

 

Without crossing into delusion,

optimism as an extremism

is one psychological perfection.

 

How to Live

 

What else to do but to make the best of things?

You should appreciate something that's good

because to not, would be ingratitude.

And, something bad still needs to be dealt with

without falling into pessimism,

because to fall would make the matter worse.

 

- Rabbi Chaim Gruber

 

 

Rabbi Chaim Gruber's theology focuses on (a) the union of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; and (b) the amalgamation of that union with secular thought.

The previous two poems express the rabbi’s theology in that the poems logically explain both the Judeo-Christian obligation to “love the LORD thy God” and the Islamic obligation to love Allah. Consider: Judeo-Christian or Islamic monotheism respectively names omnipresence either the LORD or Allah (Orthodox Jews call the LORD “Hashem”). Therefore, because omnipresence includes all of life’s good and bad circumstances, loving the LORD or loving Allah is making the very best of whatever life throws one’s way.

However, theologically, the LORD/Allah is both omnipresent and distinct from creation. Beyond our full understanding, the Creator of the Universe is more than the created universe. In fact, the Creator’s ability to bend nature is what accounts for the existence of true miracles.